PEOPLE OF TWO WORLDS

Over the past 35 years the Indian-American community in Silicon Valley has come of age. It has grown from being a small group of several thousand individuals in 1980 into one of today’s largest and most prosperous communities in California – or in the US for that matter. Yet like many other things in Silicon Valley, it is unique, and not simply another instance of the Indian Diaspora.

Most Silicon Valley Indian-Americans we meet are people who are truly at home in both worlds. They are comfortably American, blending seamlessly into and fully participating in their chosen professions and communities. At the same time, they maintain close family (and frequently also business) ties to India. They deserve a financial advisor who understands the realities and dynamics of both of the worlds they live in.

NOT JUST “NRIs

Unfortunately, many advisors who serve the Indian diaspora are not even aware of the unique tax, legal, professional, and other challenges that Indian-Americans in general face, much less those faced by Silicon Valley residents. Indian-Americans aren’t simply “non-resident Indians” (NRIs). They are full-fledged American citizens or American residents with unique opportunities, challenges, and needs that arise because their lives, wealth, and businesses span both countries. Where appropriate, we collaborate with trusted colleagues and professionals in India to create solutions for our clients that address these complex needs.

Some of the challenges we may help clients face include:

  • Deciding how to approach inherited property located in India.
  • Helping to ensure that all appropriate US tax filing requirements have been met. (NB: Griffin Black does not prepare individual tax returns.)
  • Creating an estate plan (succession plan) that spans both countries.
  • Integrating investment assets held in both countries into a portfolio that reflects the client’s true investment goals and risk tolerance.
  • Planning for American (citizen or permanent resident) family members to spend extended periods of time with family in India.
  • Considering the possibility / advisability of sponsoring family members – especially elderly family members – for American permanent residency (green card).
  • Addressing the needs for elderly family members in India for long-term care as they age.